Children’s Health

The concept of gamification is increasingly gaining popularity-;tourists frequently traveling overseas earn frequent flier points from their preferred airline; customers purchasing apparel from their favorite fashion outlet accumulate customer loyalty points. Both of these examples involve gamification: the inclusion of game-like features (points) to increase the odds of a desired outcome (a future purchase). Although
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Researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have published the most comprehensive description to date of the rare genetic disorder known as WAGR syndrome. This new report identified several clinical issues not classically associated with the disease and provides guidance for proper diagnosis, management, and potential treatment options. The findings were recently published in the
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Restoring hearing through cochlear implantation for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can help them understand spoken language and enhance social interactions, according to a study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. The study reported long-term outcomes of the largest number of children with ASD who received a cochlear implant, with
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A new study from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison has found children’s books may perpetuate gender stereotypes. Such information in early education books could play an integral role in solidifying gendered perceptions in young children. The results are available in the December issue of the journal Psychological Science. “Some of the stereotypes
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Researchers in Japan have evaluated hemodynamic factors that may help identify sites where aneurysms are likely to form. Detailed findings of this study are described in the article “Computational fluid dynamic analysis of the initiation of cerebral aneurysms” by Soichiro Fujimura et al., published today in the Journal of Neurosurgery. Unruptured aneurysms are most often
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During the early phase of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections were less common in children. As a result, many were under the widely debated assumption that children were less susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Since late 2019, the global understanding of the epidemiology of SARS CoV-2 infection
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HSE academics joined researchers from the Turner Scientific Research Institute for Children’s Orthopaedics to study how the brains of children with arthrogryposis control elbow flexion after muscle transplantation. They found that in such patients, more motor neuron activity occurs, which means that the start of a new movement requires more effort from the brain. The
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A study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports in adolescents 11-14 years old, that schools account for a small, but significant part of a young person’s mental health. As young people transition back-to-school, we must prioritize their mental health and consider what we can
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A team led by scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine, Scripps Research and the University of Chicago has identified an important site of vulnerability on influenza viruses—a site that future influenza vaccines and antibody therapies should be able to target to prevent or treat infections by a broad set of influenza strains. The scientists, whose results
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Fast food giant McDonald’s seems to be focusing on kids in lower middle income countries, with more Instagram posts, price promotions, and child friendly marketing than is evident for wealthier nations, reveals an analysis of the company’s social media marketing across 15 countries and published in the open access journal BMJ Nutrition Prevention & Health.
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A new study suggests that a parenting educational intervention for first-born children is robust enough to influence the weight of second-born children, according to a paper published online in Obesity, The Obesity Society’s flagship journal. The findings presented make the Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories (INSIGHT) program the first educational intervention for
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The protein UBR7 acts as a histone chaperone, regulating histone re-deposition at specific sites during DNA replication, according a recent study published in The EMBO Journal. This protein was previously identified to regulate nucleotide metabolism, making UBR7 among the first proteins known to affect both processes, according to Daniel Foltz, PhD, associate professor of Biochemistry
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The Real-time Assessment of Community Transmission-1 (REACT-1) study has been tracking the transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) throughout England since May 2020. SARS-CoV-2 is the cause of the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.  The first survey report showed the decline of the first SARS-CoV-2 wave in England. The subsequent survey characterized the
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Treating bacterial infections associated with orthopedic implants has often been a case of too little, too late. The traditional therapy has been a combination of prolonged antibiotics, including rifampin, a 50-year-old drug that has been a staple in the global fight against tuberculosis and other bacterial diseases. However, the inability to determine how much rifampin
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An article published in the Journal of Clinical Medicine reveals child maltreatment increases some determining risk factors in adolescents’ suicidal behaviors. According to this research, people who have suffered child maltreatment are more likely to show personality traits that are related to intense anger, impulsivity and emotion dysregulation. Also, they tend to undergo more stressful
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A team of scientists at the University of Oslo, Oslo University Hospital (OUH) Radiumhospitalet and Karolinska Institutet, led by Professor Johanna Olweus, has developed a new type of immunotherapy for cancer. The new treatment makes the patient’s immune cells “believe” that cancer is a transplanted organ that should be rejected. The immune cells then attack
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