Children’s Health

Scientists have discovered that the rotavirus vaccine reduces the likelihood of children being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Rotavirus causes a severe gastrointestinal illness characterized by diarrhea and dehydration. It is rarely fatal in developed countries but can be deathly in low-income countries. Kateryna Kon | Shutterstock The authors of the current study looked at
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Multiple sclerosis is a progressive disease that can severely damage nerves throughout the body. Symptoms tend to worsen, and as the disease progresses, it can cause impaired speech and motor skills. Multiple sclerosis (MS) can lead to significant difficulties in performing daily tasks and can greatly affect a person’s quality of life. There is no
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A new study has found a high incidence of headaches in pediatric stroke survivors and identified a possible association between post-stroke headache and stroke recurrence. Headache developed in over a third of participating children, on average six months after the stroke. Fifteen percent of patients suffered another stroke, typically in the first six to 12
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In a large new Kaiser Permanente study, children who were up to date on their pertussis vaccine schedule were far less likely to develop the disease than unvaccinated children. However, most pertussis cases were in fully vaccinated children. The risk of vaccinated children becoming ill increased with the time since vaccination, suggesting that waning effectiveness
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New research finds that the immunotherapy drug teplizumab delays the onset of type 1 diabetes by 2 years, on average, in high-risk individuals. New research has significant clinical implications, particularly for young people with a high risk of type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease affecting about 1.25 million children and adults
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Pooping regularly is a sign of a healthy digestive tract. Everyone’s bowel habits are slightly different, but going too long without pooping can be a sign of an underlying health condition that may require medical attention. There is no specific number of times a person should poop per day, since everyone’s bowel habits are different.
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Jun 6 2019 New research has found no increased risk of congenital malformations associated with treatment with radiotherapy or chemotherapy in children of fathers with testicular cancer. The study, by Yahia Al-Jebari of Lund University, Sweden and colleagues, is published in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine on June 4, 2019. It followed 4,207 children of
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Smartphones, tablets and video consoles can be addictive. They interfere with sleep. They draw kids into an alternate universe, often distracting them from more productive — and healthier — real-world activities. And they are linked to anxiety and depression, learning disabilities and obesity. That’s according to a growing body of research emphasizing the physical and
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Acropustulosis is an uncommon skin condition that causes itchy bumps, or pustules, to develop on the skin. It usually appears in babies but can also affect adults. Acropustulosis typically occurs on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. Although the pustules can be itchy and uncomfortable, the condition is not serious and
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Obese children are four times more likely to become obese adults making childhood obesity a significant health threat. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, found the Developing Relationships that Include Values of Eating and Exercise (DRIVE) curriculum mitigated weight gain in at-risk children as well as prompting
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Careful documentation of a hospice patient’s end-of-life wishes – and prominently noting that information in health records early – could prevent unwanted hospitalizations and medical interventions, a new study suggests. Researchers at The Ohio State University analyzed the health records of 1,185 cancer patients who had been referred to hospice and found that a verified
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Jun 6 2019 Rettsyndrome.org announced their funding of two new research projects today. Jeannie T. Lee, MD, Ph.D. of Massachusetts General Hospital is awarded a two-year ANGEL Grant for $600,000 to focus on reactivating the silent X chromosome for Rett syndrome and Davut Pehlivan, MDof Baylor College of Medicine is awarded a two-year Mentored Clinical
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