Month: December 2019

[embedded content] Health products powered by artificial intelligence, or AI, are streaming into our lives, from virtual doctor apps to wearable sensors and drugstore chatbots. IBM boasted that its AI could “outthink cancer.” Others say computer systems that read X-rays will make radiologists obsolete. “There’s nothing that I’ve seen in my 30-plus years studying medicine
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A systematic review and meta-analysis led by St. Michael’s Hospital of Unity Health Toronto found children who drank whole milk had 40 per cent lower odds of being overweight or obese compared with children who consumed reduced-fat milk. The research, published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, analyzed 28 studies from seven countries that
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Pregnant women exposed to persistent organic pollutants, or POPs, had slightly smaller fetuses than women who haven’t been exposed to these chemicals, according to an analysis of ultrasound scans by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions. The researchers also found that the women in their study had lower levels of POPs
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This article may include advertisements, paid product features, affiliate links and other forms of sponsorship. Share the love: All parents want their kids to succeed. When you provide for your children, it is important to not only meet their living needs, but also their needs for the future. Your children will be entering a competitive
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Photo: iStockphoto Making your family better, stronger, more harmonious may not require a complete overhaul, but rather a few strategic tweaks. Here’s a roundup of the resolutions you and your family should make now to ensure a fabulous 2019! 1. Hold family meetings. Give everyone in the family—including the kids—an opportunity to be heard. Provide the
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Identical twins with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often experience large differences in symptom severity even though they share the same DNA, according to an analysis funded by the National Institutes of Health. The findings suggest that identifying the causes of this variability may inform the treatment of ASD-related symptoms. The study was conducted by John
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The proportion of high-strength painkiller poisonings among children which result in emergency hospital admissions has increased, according to research published in the peer-reviewed journal Clinical Toxicology. A study involving more than 200,000 US pediatric cases of pain-relief misuse, abuse or self-harm highlights how the opioid crisis is affecting young people. The results show that although
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New research from University of Alberta neuroscientists shows that the brains of adolescents struggling with mental-health issues may be wired differently from those of their healthy peers. This collaborative research, led by Anthony Singhal, professor and chair in the Department of Psychology, involved adolescents between the ages of 14 and 17 who had a history
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In response to the pressing public health issue of vaping, clinicians of all disciplines are being asked to address this issue with youth, families and community members, despite minimal youth-focused screening or treatment guidelines. Physicians from Boston Medical Center and the University of Montreal have developed a set of recommendations that provide important insights about
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Although a fever is not typically dangerous, when it occurs during pregnancy, it may affect a developing fetus. A fever occurs when a person’s body reaches a higher temperature than the expected normal range. In this article, learn more about the symptoms, causes, and treatment options for a fever, as well as the effects a
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Leftover prescription opioids pose big risks to kids, yet most parents keep their own and their child’s unused painkillers even after they’re no longer medically necessary for pain. But a new University of Michigan study suggests that convenient disposal paired with tailored risk education can improve those numbers. Terri Voepel-Lewis, U-M associate professor of nursing,
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This article may include advertisements, paid product features, affiliate links and other forms of sponsorship. Some people are just natural born joke tellers.  They’re the ones who break the ice and make small talk fun.  For others, they have to learn to flex those joke-telling muscles.  How does one learn to be funny? Well, it
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Pregnant women living with HIV don’t always receive antiretroviral medications recommended for use in pregnancy, according to a recent study published in Jama Network Open this week. Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago’s researchers collaborated in the multi-site Surveillance Monitoring for ART Toxicities (SMARTT) study of the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS)
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Image: Shutterstock Studies suggest the occasional use of the Scottish surnames or last names started somewhere between the 10th and 12th centuries when the Normans introduced them in 1066. However, the more frequent use of Scottish surnames started around the 18th and 19th centuries. Some of the Scottish surnames are known to have patronymic, habitational,
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